Hegel and the Infinite: Religion, Politics, and Dialectic (Insurrections: Critical Studies in Religion, Politics, and Culture)

Hegel and the Infinite: Religion, Politics, and Dialectic (Insurrections: Critical Studies in Religion, Politics, and Culture)

Slavoj Žižek


Catherine Malabou, Antonio Negri, John D. Caputo, Bruno Bosteels, Mark C. Taylor, and Slavoj Žižek subscribe to seven others—including William Desmond, Katrin Pahl, Adrian Johnston, Edith Wyschogrod, and Thomas A. Lewis—to follow Hegel's concept to twenty-first-century philosophy, politics, and faith. taking away claims that the evolution of concept and heritage is at an finish, those thinkers guard Hegel's options opposed to irrelevance and, importantly, reset the excellence of secular and sacred.

These unique contributions specialize in Hegelian research and the transformative worth of the philosopher's suggestion when it comes to our present "turn to religion." Malabou develops Hegel's motif of confession with regards to forgiveness; Negri writes of Hegel's philosophy of correct; Caputo reaffirms the unconventional theology made attainable by means of Hegel; and Bosteels reviews trendy readings of the thinker and argues opposed to the reducibility of his dialectic. Taylor reclaims Hegel's absolute as a means of countless restlessness, and Žižek revisits the spiritual implications of Hegel's suggestion of letting cross. Mirroring the philosopher's personal trajectory, those essays development dialectically via politics, theology, paintings, literature, philosophy, and technological know-how, traversing state of the art theoretical discourse and illuminating the ways that Hegel inhabits them.

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