The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Prisoners of War from the Revolution to the War on Terror

The Enemy in Our Hands: America's Treatment of Prisoners of War from the Revolution to the War on Terror

Robert C. Doyle


Revelations of abuse at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib legal and the U.S. detention camp at Guantánamo Bay had repercussions extending past the global media scandal that ensued. the debate surrounding images and outlines of inhumane therapy of enemy prisoners of warfare, or EPWs, from the conflict on terror marked a watershed momentin the examine of recent battle and the remedy of prisoners of warfare. Amid allegations of human rights violations and battle crimes, one query stands proud one of the relaxation: used to be the remedy of America's latest prisoners of conflict an remoted occasion or a part of a troubling and complicated factor that's deeply rooted in our nation's army history?Military professional Robert C. Doyle's The Enemy in Our arms: America's therapy of Prisoners of conflict from the Revolution to the struggle on Terror attracts from varied assets to reply to this query. old in addition to well timed in its content material, this paintings examines America's significant wars and previous conflicts -- between them, the yank Revolution, the Civil battle, international Wars I and II, and Vietnam -- to supply realizing of the UnitedStates' remedy of army and civilian prisoners. The Enemy in Our palms bargains a brand new viewpoint of U.S. army heritage with regards to EPWs and means that the strategies hired to regulate prisoners of struggle are exact and disparate from one clash tothe subsequent. as well as different very important info, Doyle presents a cultural research and exploration of U.S. adherence to foreign criteria of behavior, together with the 1929 Geneva conference in every one battle. even if wars are usually not gained or misplaced at the foundation of the way EPWs are taken care of, the therapy of prisoners is likely one of the measures wherein history's conquerors are judged.

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