Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't

Theological Incorrectness: Why Religious People Believe What They Shouldn't

D. Jason Slone


"Ask non secular humans one query, and you will get 3 answers!"
Why do non secular humans think what they shouldn't--not what others imagine they will not think, yet issues that do not accord with their very own avowed spiritual ideals? This attractive publication explores this complicated characteristic of human behavior.
D. Jason Slone phrases this phenomenon "theological incorrectness." He demonstrates that it exists as the brain is outfitted it this sort of means that it is traditional for us to imagine divergent recommendations at the same time. Human minds are nice at bobbing up with leading edge rules that aid them make experience of the area, he says, yet these rules don't consistently jibe with legit non secular ideals. From this truth we derive the $64000 lesson that what we research from our environment--religious rules, for example--does no longer inevitably reason us to act in methods in line with that knowledge.
Slone provides the newest discoveries from the cognitive technological know-how of faith and indicates how they assist us to appreciate precisely why it truly is that non secular humans do and imagine issues that they can not. He then applies those insights to 3 case stories. First he appears to be like at why Theravada Buddhists profess that Buddha used to be only a guy yet really worship him as a god. Then he explores why the early Puritan Calvinists, who believed in predestination, acted as an alternative as though people had loose will via, for instance, undertaking witch-hunts and looking converts. ultimately, he explains why either Christians and Buddhists think in success even supposing the doctrines of Divine windfall and karma recommend there is not any such thing.
In looking solutions to profound questions on why humans behave the best way they do, this interesting ebook sheds new mild at the workings of the human brain and at the complicated courting among cognition and culture.

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