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EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
via RadioBusinessReport.com...

HD Radio Electronic Program Guide goes to field trial in Boston

A field trial of an HD Radio Electronic Program Guide (EPG) ecosystem for AM and FM radio is now underway in the Boston market. This field trial is being conducted as part of an NAB FASTROAD project to develop the business requirements, system architecture and specifications of an EPG-an interactive, on-screen guide to scheduled broadcast programming-suited to the HD Radio market for local broadcasters. Stations from the markets adjacent to Boston including Worcester, Massachusetts and Providence will also be involved, showing how an HD Radio EPG can serve listeners as they travel.

Numerous HD Radio broadcasters have agreed to participate in the trial, including stations owned by Greater Media, Clear Channel, CBS, Emerson College and the University of Massachusetts. Other stations are expected to join the trial as it progresses.

iBiquity CEO Bob Struble tells RBR: “The easiest way to think about EPG is the cable channel which shows all of the shows and scrolls and you can pick out which show you want to go to. We’re trying to do the same thing with radio with the HD Radio data pipe. We think this will be pretty important, especially with all of the HD2’s and HD3’s out there—people are going to want to know what’s on the radio in their particular market. It’s a reasonably complex thing to pull together, because you’ve got to collect programming data from all of the stations and then you’ve got to transmit it over the air. Then you’ve got to have radios which pick that up and display it correctly. This trial is the first time where all of this is pulled together and we’re actually showing live in Boston a trial of how all of that can be done.”

The results will be displayed at The NAB Radio Show in Philly.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
Via Radio-Online...

New HD Radio Designs Enable Low-Power, Low-Cost Units

iBiquity Digital, the developer of HD Radio, said Tuesday that next generation chipsets, modules and software development kits from Samsung and others will enable a much wider range of low cost radio receivers in new form factors, with new features. The announcement comes on the heels of a similar set of announcements detailing lower-cost and higher-performance building blocks for manufacturers of HD Radio broadcast equipment.

As of this week, both Samsung and SiPort are now shipping new HD Radio chipsets to dozens of receiver makers covering both the automotive and home/office markets. These chipsets are enabling lower-power receiver designs as well as smaller form-factors. Plus, mobile devices will span both automotive and non-automotive applications.

Additionally, Sanyo is shipping a single-chip digital radio tuner/digital signal processor -- a fundamental component to HD Radio receiver designs. The new tuner is also enabling more compact and lower-cost designs of high-performance car radios and audio processing systems.

iBiquity has also focused on moving software design forwards with support for iTunes tagging. A trio of companies -- SamBoo InfoTech, Analog & Digital Soft Company and KRS Electronics -- are providing software-development kit support for specific applications, ranging from head units, to personal navigation devices, to iPod docks, and automotive head-ends, mini-shelf systems and AV receivers. (05-27-08)
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
Microsoft to release Zune HD which offers HD Radio tuner, OLED 3.3" screen, HDMI connection for HD video out, touch screen optimized Explorer web browser, wifi as well as other features @ $100 less than the iTouch, available Sept. 15th.
It doesn't specifically say if it will capture MP3 off the HD Radio and store it. Legality of that is probably an issue they might be avoiding. You can buy songs for it. Probably a lot will depend if the carrier locks features like uploading your own MP3s from CD's you bought, which I my knowledge is legal. Then again these days................
 

Piggie

Super Moderator
via RadioBusinessReport.com...
This is the type of thing I was talking about earlier that would make IBOC (any digital terrestrial radio) competitive with satellite radio. If a guide is downloadable, then software can be written into a device where you program it to hunt for what you want. Again the biggest thing I hear from truckers about loving satellite radio is not constantly tuning for new stations.

Lets say there is a talk radio show you like. I would hunt the dial to see if any station was playing that. Then add a downloadable list for the day of stations and it would have a heads up on which channels to scan, say also with a GPS to give it some idea which stations might be in range.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
I think there is something called iTunes Tagging, but Im not sure how that works....with regards to marking an HD Radio tune for recording or downloading/purchase or some such.

Here is a good article on iTunes Tagging.

Though support for the feature was added to iTunes 7.4, iTunes Tagging remains one of the least-understood expansions of the iPod ecosystem—arguably, for good reason. Developed by Apple and implemented in new iPod speaker systems by companies such as Polk Audio and JBL, iTunes Tagging enables an HD Radio tuner to record information about the currently playing track, save it to an iPod, and let the iPod’s user easily find that track in the iTunes Store for purchase. Here’s a look at how iTunes Tagging works with Polk Audio’s new I-Sonic ES2, iTunes 7.6, and an iPod classic.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
CNET reviews the Sony XDR-F1HD

The good:
Budget-priced AM/FM HD Radio component delivers extraordinary sound quality and low-noise reception; small size; remote control; bright backlit LCD screen.

The bad:
No digital output; weak HD signals cause the XDR-F1HD to switch back and forth between analog and HD; the memory doesn't retain station presets if the radio is unplugged from AC power.

The bottom line:
Hailed by audiophiles as one of the greatest tuners ever, the Sony XDR-F1HD is arguably the best--and most affordable--way to add HD radio to any stereo system.

CNET editors' review

Reviewed by: Steve Guttenberg
Edited by: John P. Falcone
Reviewed on: 11/18/2008

comprehensive review continues...
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
Biggest complaint with Zune HD is storage space.

Zune HD Draws Mixed Reviews

Users like built in Wi-Fi and touch screen but decry limited storage capacity.

By Paul McDougall
InformationWeek
August 14, 2009 08:26 AM

Microsoft's new Zune HD MP3 player is drawing mixed reviews from online shoppers -- some like nifty new features like the touch-screen interface while others pan the device's limited storage space.

"I think they've done a really good job with the Zune HD. It's gonna be awesome," said Melissa Bougneit, who posted a review Thursday on Amazon.com.

But C. Hunt said even the larger 32 GB Zune HD is lacking in terms of having enough space to store songs, videos, and other digital content. "I've got myself an 80 GB and the biggest Zune would leave me hanging with nothing left for expansion," said Hunt.

A user going by the name "Blink Blink" agreed. "32 GB is an insult to me and many of Zune's loyal users," "Blink Blink" said of the player, which uses flash-based memory and thus has less space than MP3 players that rely on a hard disk drive to save content.

On the upside, flash devices are generally more response than those that use HDD and start up faster.

Even "Blink Blink" said Zune's overall design and advanced features were impressive. "I'm a power user and all of its specifications are an Apple buster," said the user.

Both the 16 GB black version and the 32 GB platinum model Zune HDs can be pre-ordered from Microsoft's Zune site or from retailers such as Amazon, Best Buy, and Wal-Mart. The 16 GB device is priced at $219, while its larger cousin goes for $289.

Zune HD is the first Zune model to feature a touch-screen interface similar to that found on Apple's iPhone. It also offers a built-in HD Radio receiver, 720p HD video output capabilities, a Wi-Fi antenna, and a Web browser. Zune HD uses Nvidia's Tegra chip, an ultralow-power HD processor, to achieve high-definition output.

Microsoft needs Zune HD to be a hit, as the company has become all but an afterthought in a mobile entertainment market dominated by Apple's iPhone and iPod devices. Revenue from the company's Entertainment and Devices Division, which houses Zune, fell 25% year-over-year in the most recent quarter -- to $1.2 billion.
 
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EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
Ron Smith Aerials in the UK offers a line of modular antenna kits...you can expand to higher gain and more directivity down the road! Be sure to check out the FM Aerials and Specifications pages...Galaxy and Orion lines.

The driven element is an FM Loop, surrounded by directors and reflectors, including corner reflectors. Kind of like a Quagi but a bit more busy.

 
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Piggie

Super Moderator
The driven element is an FM Loop, surrounded by directors and reflectors, including corner reflectors. Kind of like a Quagi but a bit more busy.
I was chatting with Trip last night and mentioned to him, why doesn't anyone use loops (not folded dipoles) for driven elements? 2 db more gain, plus less reception of impulse noise. It's a no brainer except for mechanical design and support.
 

EscapeVelocity

Moderator, , Webmaster of EV's Antenna Blog
Report from Radio Magazine describing the NPR Labs test of the Boston Acoustics Receptor and the FM Reflect, Radio Shack Budget 1874 Rabbit Ears, and a couple of amplified indoor FM and AM/FM antennas. Discussion of amplification and its effects are of note.

Better Recepter reception

May 1, 2006 12:00 PM, By Chriss Scherer, editor

Radio Magazine

excerpt...

NPR Labs found that while the upper channels have a higher signal level, the noise floor is also increased. For example, the WTOP signal is about 20dB higher than it was with the folded dipole, but the 30dB increase in the noise floor actually decreases the WTOP S/N ratio by about 10dB. The S/N ratio for the lower channel stations is even worse. Similar results were found for other active antennas that sell for less than $70.
Here is the NPR Labs report on Indoor FM HD Radio Antenna Performance Tests.
 
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