Grounding a Telescopic Mast?

mrlewp87

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
I’ve set up a 3 pc. telescoping mast, and wanted to follow safety measures, and code. Only AFTER tapping a 3/8” hole, and securing a sturdy clamp to accept a #6 copper wire, did I have any doubts about where I’d chosen for the clamp. At (near) the bottom.
I think the question and anticipated answer would apply regardless if using a new ground rod, or connecting the #6 wire to the home power service ground by whatever means.
“Does the mast ground wire need to be run to the TOP of the mast?”
While it’s true that it’s an all-metal 3 section mast, I believe it was factory painted. It’s over 30 yrs. old, but in great shape. I’m wondering about the connectivity between the 3 pcs., possibly defeating the reasons for grounding the mast. I’ve read from multiple sources that the resistance measured from the grounding conductor across the connection to the grounding electrode should be 25 ohms or less. ( found it a bit amusing, since I’m troubled by every 1/10 an ohm thru any electrical connection I’ve created. ;-)

I can easily imagine a fluctuating readout from an ohm-meter, connected at the top and bottom of this mast, affected by wind while carrying a 12 ft. antenna and rotor on top. That brings me to my question, run the #6 wire up to the top? Or,... would extra* tightening of the large set screws between the pieces effectively make for one single mast?
 

mrlewp87

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#2
Well, mrlewp87. In simpler terms, you’re asking “when grounding a telescopic antenna, would it be best to attach the grounding conductor at the very top of the mast, vs. at the bottom?”
 

mrlewp87

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#3
My 2 cents, I believe a lightning strike would have no difficulty completing the path from top of the upper section, to bottom of the lower section and then to the ground rod. In spite of having been painted, especially since I’m aware that you performed a lot of wire brushing where the sections meet after hours spent freeing them up.
 

mrlewp87

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#4
Let’s not forget however, that the 3 pc. current path still needs to be well established at all* times, not just in case of a lightning strike. A top to bottom connectivity is needed to discharge static build-up. Of course, along with the coax ground block near entry to the home.
 
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