Question: Need help determining which indoor antenna to use for my application

krismanme

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#1
Good Evening all,
I have been off cable for several years now, but only after a recent move to WA did the lack of available channels begin to affect us. We currently live in Kent, WA, a smaller city about ~15mi south of seattle.

According to TV Fool a majority of our stations are in Seattle but the issue is we live in a small valley, that is hills around us in every direction. To make matters worse we live in a three story apartment complex on the first floor. Our apartment is blocked on all sides by multiple three story apartments, and decorative(Large) trees. On top of all of that, the first floor apartments are partially recessed 4' into the ground.

I currently have a Winegard FL5500A amplified antenna, but i see now that i would probably have better results with a directional antenna. Can anyone give me a recommendation of antenna? Or information on the setup i might need?

Outdoor installations are pretty much out of the question, unless they can sit about ground level, and are wireless(kidding). No attic available either. My current setup is 8' high on the wall, which in reality (due to the apartment being on a slope) is only realy 2' above ground level. I wouldn't mind a second antenna either if it would make a huge difference. We currently get 6 Channels, 2 ION, 1 QUBO, 2 QVC, 1Gospel

TV Fool
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#2
:welcome: krismanme

I live in Seattle and am familiar with your area. You have a good antenna survey, but I strongly suspect you will need an outdoor antenna. Do you have a patio or deck where an antenna could be located? If not, do you have a window that faces north?

Jim
 

krismanme

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#3
I have a small back patio. Literally 8' by 4' with no way to route cables indoors, and not to mention its against my lease to install any antennas/dishes. However i do have an window facing nort,h 2 actually.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#4
BINGO - YOU WIN and guess what? In your case our Federal Government Law makes it illegal for your landlord to stop you from using an outdoor antenna. Check this link: https://www.fcc.gov/guides/over-air-reception-devices-rule

There is a way to run coax through doorways or windows using a very special flat and thin adapter. Are you now really interested? You should be and please advise.

Jim
 
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krismanme

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#5
Wow, policy i never knew existed, in that case i am extrememly interested. I guess the questions i have now is what is this magical device that can run through, in my case, a patio door without much interference? and i will need some kind of mast and a way to anchor or support it, i dont have a yard.
 

krismanme

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#7
Alright, i'll catch up with you in the morning;

(Mods feel free to delete this post if im breaking any rules)
I found the flat jumper cable you are referring to, the only issue i see is dramatic loss, probably enough to make it not even worth it, unless i can find something like these at 75ohm:
http://www.amazon.com/Comet-Original-CTC-50M-Window-Feed-Thru/dp/B005OEB3IA

Amazon.com: MGC50 ~Window/door gap coax flat jumper,SO-239: Sports & Outdoors

Sorry if i am missing something obvious, thank you for your prompt responses!
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#9
...
I found the flat jumper cable you are referring to, the only issue i see is dramatic loss, probably enough to make it not even worth it, unless i can find something like these at 75ohm:
http://www.amazon.com/Comet-Original-CTC-50M-Window-Feed-Thru/dp/B005OEB3IA

Amazon.com: MGC50 ~Window/door gap coax flat jumper,SO-239: Sports & Outdoors
You have the right idea but those jumpers are designed for 50 ohm applications such as CB radio and low-power VHF Ham radio and they use connectors that are different than those used for TV. You need a jumper like Steve posted which is 75 ohms and has the correct fittings. I bought one to test from Fry's and noticed no signal loss.

Jim
 
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krismanme

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#10
I did realize they were 50ohm, and would require different connectors, i was just pointing out that alot of people complained about the quality of the 2$-10$ flat RG6 cables, and another forum out there recommended these(I believe it was intended for folks that were broadcasting though). After some more reading, and your recommendations i have come to the conclusion i will use the flat cable, as i will gain more than i will lose by running my antenna outdoors.

I guess my next question is, what style antenna should i be looking at? i would even be up for the challenge of making it myself.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#11
Since you have two VHF channels (and their sub-channels) to your north, I would suggest a Channel Master HD-4221 which is a screen-type antenna that doesn't significantly block any neighbor's view. That antenna is 'okay' on VHF and per your report, I think you will be able capture RF 9 and 11 (and possibly 13) when pointed northish, especially it you aim it slightly west after establishing the QA and Capitol Hill channels.

I checked on our local Craigslist to see if there was an antenna appropriate for your area and there is one, but the offered price is absurd.

Jim
 
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krismanme

DTVUSA Jr. Member
#12
i guess i should mention im not really worried about the neighbors, lke i said i dont have a yard, i have an enclosed patio. The only view of my neighbors ill be blocking is the view into my living room. Thank you for the suggestion, i will do a bit more research and then let you know what i decide.
 
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