New Verizon FiOS Customers Offered 2-Year Price Guarantee, With or Without a Contract

James

DTVUSA Member
#1
NEW YORK, Feb. 7, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- Making it even easier for cable users to confidently switch to FiOS, Verizon introduced today a two-year price-guarantee offer for new customers who order FiOS Internet, TV and voice service before April 19.

All new customers will receive a two-year price guarantee. The offers also include a free upgrade to FiOS Quantum 50/25 megabits per second (Mbps) Internet; FiOS TV Prime HD with more than 215 channels (more than 55 in HD); and FiOS Digital Voice home phone service with unlimited nationwide calling. As a further incentive, customers who choose a two-year agreement also receive a $250 Visa prepaid card. New customers who order online receive an additional $10 per month savings.

Looks like Verizon is working to make the switch tasty and appealing to new customers. The deal is laid out on the Fios/verizon website. Take a look.

New Verizon FiOS Customers Offered 2-Year Price Guarantee, With or Without a Contract
 
#2
I can definitely see us all getting addicted to the much higher download speeds offered by Verizon. It does make you wonder though, what the max download speed that the average consumer considers "usable" really is with the current buffering technology. I can't wait to have the option to get the super "high" speeds available where we live though...if not just to check it out.
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#3
Yes-how much does one need? I understand the higher speeds/greater capacity is useful when you have several people/devices all using the bandwidth at the same time.
 
#4
Yes-how much does one need?
I have 20 Mbps and never use more than 10 (one person). You can tell by running speedtest.net at the same time you're streaming a couple programs at the same time. I guess if I downloaded a lot of huge files... but you can do that in the background while doing other things. If I had 10 Mbps instead of 20, I don't think I'd notice the difference.

Rick
 

James

DTVUSA Member
#5
I have 20 Mbps and never use more than 10 (one person). You can tell by running speedtest.net at the same time you're streaming a couple programs at the same time. I guess if I downloaded a lot of huge files... but you can do that in the background while doing other things. If I had 10 Mbps instead of 20, I don't think I'd notice the difference.

Rick
I just tried speedtest. I got 13.5 down and 10.5 up. I was not streaming anything but being on line. I have the 50/25 plan. I suppose the wireless connection reduces the speed.
 
#6
I just tried speedtest. I got 13.5 down and 10.5 up. I was not streaming anything but being on line. I have the 50/25 plan. I suppose the wireless connection reduces the speed.
Yes, it does a little. But even if you hook computer to cable modem directly with an ethernet cable, it's going to be less than the advertised speed. 50/25 is not a guarantee, it's more of a theoretical maximum. I average something like 18 down and 1 up, though I'm supposed to be capped at 5 down and 1 up (long story).

Rick
 
#7
Wow, 18 down is really good! Do you see a true 1 up? or just a one off when you test your speeds?
I see 12.5 down and 1.5ish up on AT&T which seems to satisfy what we need in the home as well as my random work stuff.
 
#8
Wow, 18 down is really good! Do you see a true 1 up? or just a one off when you test your speeds?
Shoot, there are guys here with much faster speeds. I don't know what you mean by a one off, but it's a true 1 Mbps upload speed. It used to be 0.96 to 0.98, but they did some kind of upgrade and now it's always 1.01 to 1.07 Mbps. (Just tried it, got 1.06 and 17.28 down)

Now the fact is, when you download a very large file the download often goes in fits and starts, so you don't get the full 18 Mbps or whatever. But there's a trick for that too. Turns out Flash has technology that locks in on a stream so the path from you to server won't change while you're watching YouTube or whatever. So believe it or not, if you run a Flash video in the background, very large files will usually download faster! Naturally that's not going to work if you're at ~10 Mbps or less -- the video will take up too much of the bandwidth. It's even possible to trick your computer into thinking a Flash video is running when it's not, but that's more trouble than it's worth.

Rick
 
#9
@Rick,
Nice trick on the stream lock down while playing Flash! I hadn't heard of that one before, so definitely going to try it out next time I have to download an extremely large file!
 
#10
@Rick,
Nice trick on the stream lock down while playing Flash! I hadn't heard of that one before, so definitely going to try it out next time I have to download an extremely large file!
Cool. I should mention I only tested this with XP and that was a couple years ago. I'm curious to see if it works for later operating systems. Maybe 7 or whatever has a way of confining the lock to a particular browser window. You'd think they could do that ...

Rick
 
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