over the air hdtv reception during storms

U

Unregistered

Guest
#1
Is it pretty much guaranteed that TV signals get jumbled during a rain and lightning storm? We pull really strong signals here in San Antonio, TX and yet every time a storm rolls through, our reception drops.

Our antenna is mounted outdoors and it's pretty well installed and wind resistant.
 

MrPogi

Moderator, , Webmaster of Cache Free TV
Staff member
#2
Yes, in severe weather you will probably have some dropouts - but no more so than with satellite TV in the same situation.

One thing you may want to check is that you have it mounted so it has no play. The wind whipping your antenna around can push it enough for the signal to drop.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#4
Guest,

I use OTA reception and in spite of 'hard weather' in my reception area (Seattle) over the last 4 years OTA has been FAR more dependible than Cable or Sat.

When my neighbors ask me when their TV might work again, I revel in saying: "What are you talking about, my TV (reception) works fine!"

Jim

PS They pay through their noses and I pay zero and they really do have reasons to whine. I do not. LOL!
 
#5
Here's the thing about cable. It goes out, ALL the channels go out, along with your phone and internet connection if you bundle (shudder). When an OTA station goes out, nine times out of ten there are half a dozen other stations that work. Unless the power goes -- then you're toast.

Rick
 

Jim5506

DTVUSA Member
#6
The frequencies at which OTA TV reception is transmitted are relatively immune from weather related attenuation, except for the VHF spectrum being susceptible to lightening inpulses which may cause momentary dropouts on digital TV.

Some weather phenomina actually improve OTA reception such as weather fronts acting as a focusing mechanism for DX-ing, but this 200+mile reception is not very common and never reliable.

If your reception is weak enough to be near the digital cliff, heavy rain or even the movement of trees by the wind can cause problems, but these are best fixed with better equipment (bigger antennas and taller masts/towers).
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#7
Terrestrial TV thats correctly set up (and not on the very margins of a coverage area) shouldn't drop out unless there is lightning nearby. Rain and wind should not affect it.
 

Fringe Reception

Super Moderator, Chief Content Editor
Staff member
#8
Terrestrial TV thats correctly set up (and not on the very margins of a coverage area) shouldn't drop out unless there is lightning nearby. Rain and wind should not affect it.
I haven't experienced any dropouts during local storms including lightning storms but as n-bound au posted, distant (fringe) reception can be affected by severe weather between the transmitter and the receiver (you).

There is another phenonoma which is similar to an mirage in a desert, where heat rising off of the ground 'skews' or blocks signals at or about around sunset time but again, this happens to distant station reception and in my case to one channel 75 miles away.

Some viewers have reported broken signals or loss of reception after lengthy rain storms, and it is possible for the wet earth to become a signal reflector. What happens, is the direct signal arrives at your tuner AND a second signal that has bounced off of the ground arrives a moment later, which confuses the tuner. In some cases, more antenna height will resolve this: others claim tilting an antenna slightly skyward can help.

Although not weather related, I have a third (rare) issue. Locally, seaplanes have a dedicated take-off and landing flight pattern that passes directly through the RF datastream from one station. Whenever we hear a seaplane engine, we count: "three, two, one" and our screen goes black. "One, two, three" and the picture returns.


Jim
 
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nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#9
I haven't experienced any dropouts during local storms including lightning storms but as n-bound au posted, distant (fringe) reception can be affected by severe weather between the transmitter and the receiver (you).
I will clarify this further by saying that by nearby i meant hundred of metres only.

There is another phenonoma which is similar to an mirage in a desert, where heat rising off of the ground 'skews' or blocks signals at or about around sunset time but again, this happens to distant station reception and in my case to one channel 75 miles away.
An inversion, sometimes these can increase signals aswell (May depend on different position and/or time of day).

Some viewers have reported broken signals or loss of reception after lengthy rain storms, and it is possible for the wet earth to become a signal reflector. What happens, is the direct signal arrives at your tuner AND a second signal that has bounced off of the ground arrives a moment later, which confuses the tuner. In some cases, more antenna height will resolve this: others claim tilting an antenna slightly skyward can help.
Does the DVB-T dance, hehehe. Never heard of this till now.

Although not weather related, I have a third (rare) issue. Locally, seaplanes have a dedicated take-off and landing flight pattern that passes directly through the RF datastream from one station. Whenever we hear a seaplane engine, we count: "three, two, one" and our screen goes black. "One, two, three" and the picture returns.Jim
Airplane flutter, nice, and as you say very rare, unlucky you!
 

dkreichen1968

Moderator
Staff member
#10
I haven't experienced any dropouts during local storms including lightning storms but as n-bound au posted, distant (fringe) reception can be affected by severe weather between the transmitter and the receiver (you).
Low VHF (RF2-6) is very susceptible to any electrical noise at all. Which is why most stations that had legacy low VHF channels moved higher up during the digital transition. My parents live 49 miles from KNOP North Platte, NE, which is still transmitted on RF2. Their house is at the same elevation as the transmit antenna with higher terrain between them and the tower. When there is a thunderstorm anywhere between them and the tower the signal basically goes away until the thunderstorm passes. Their high VHF station on RF channel 9 (45 miles and taller tower) doesn't have that issue (only few minor glitches). In Colorado I have almost no issues at all since I got my antenna placement down so that I'm pulling in strong enough signal on all the channels. Some glitches on the high VHF stations, but nothing major. I get more interference from my paper shredder.;)
 

nbound-au

The Graveyard Shift
#11
Our lowest digital station is VHF6* partially for that reason (and also less suseptible to other impulse interference).

* (Approx US VHF7)
 
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G

Guest

Guest
#12
I recently got a new Samsung TV and it solved most of my reception problems... very few dropouts while my old off brand TV worked about 50% of the time
 
G

Guest

Guest
#13
I have a inside antenna at the moment and it picks up about 60 miles. I get the pixel type screen when wind blows and rains.... I have a new phillips smart TV as well... SO I shouldn't be losing signal either but I do... how do I fix it?
 

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